5 More Social Media Faux Pas

I received some great feedback on my #fauxfive blog from a couple weeks ago, so I’m back with a second round. Here are five more social media faux pas:

6. Quantity vs. Quality

Thanks to the fabulous Marisa Peacock for reminding me of this one. In our efforts to communicate and in some cases, over communicate, we often begin to just push out everything we can think of to say. Remember, always have purpose to what you say. One quality post (which can be repeated to avoid #4 on my previous blog) goes a lot farther than 15 throw-away posts.

 

7. Automated messages

This seems to be a new trend, or maybe an old trend that is becoming (unfortunately) popular again, but the automated messages are appearing in my Twitter feed a lot lately.

  • I posted 14 photos on Facebook in the album “Photos”
  • Just posted a photo on instagram
  • Just posted a new vine. Go check it out!

These posts are fine once in a while, but make sure they aren’t the only thing you post, especially on Twitter. Visit your page and if the last 15 posts are all automated in some fashion, you should seriously reconsider whether or not your school (or you or your institution of any kind) really should be on Twitter (or whatever outlet you’re filling up with these messages). And, if you do choose to use automated messages from time to time, be sure they have some merit to them and give your readers a reason to click. To start with, title albums appropriately, especially if they are the only piece of information that your readers will see.

 

8. Cross-posting messages

It’s fairly common for folks to post the exact same stuff on multiple outlets. To some extent, this is fine if your outlets target different segments of the population. But it’s important to remember how your various outlets function. For example, Facebook allows paragraphs of content, while Twitter allows 140 characters. If you set your accounts so that Twitter mirrors Facebook, your Twitter posts will cut off mid-post because it runs out of characters. Understand your outlets, know when cross posting duplicate info is acceptable and when to carefully craft your messages for each.

 

9. Forgetting to be Social

Some folks forget that social media is social. Don’t just stand on a soap box and spew out your latest dish on what’s happening at your school. Have a conversation, engage your audience, and ask for their input. Have an exciting tradition at your school? Post a photo and tell your audience about it and then ask your audience to share their thoughts and memories related to that tradition.

 

10. Getting lost in the vast void of social media

This almost should be 9b., but I think it warrants its own place in the #fauxfive this week. I’m guilty of this one, too. We have great intentions of engaging our audience but we forget the “shout outs.” Give people a way to find your conversations. Use #hashtags to invite folks into your conversation – even Facebook got in on the #fun. Speak directly to folks on Twitter by using their usernames – tweet me @stacyjago. Ask people to talk to you, don’t just stand in the corner talking to yourself, hoping someone wanders by and hears you.

 

So there we go … we’re up to 10 social media faux pas now. What are yours? Tweet me your thoughts @stacyjago.

 

Stacy Jagodowski

Stacy Jagodowski

Director of Communications at Cheshire Academy

Stacy has worked in education for more than 10 years, including positions in communications and admission at both boarding and day schools in New England, Virginia and California. She currently serves as Director of Communications at Cheshire Academy in Connecticut. Outside of work, she is an aspiring photographer.

http://www.cheshireacademy.org